Public Lecture with Deborah Lupton in Malmö 6 November

I am visiting Europe to give several talks in early November. Details are as follows: Wednesday 1 November: Keynote presentation at the ‘Emotion and Affect in Dataified Worlds’ workshop, Helsinki, Finland. Friday 3 November: Opening presentation with our Wellcome Trust grant research team at the ‘Researching Young People and Digital Health Technologies’ symposium we have […]

via Talks in Europe, November 2017 — This Sociological Life

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Public Lecture with Deborah Lupton in Malmö 6 November

Tre utmaningar prioriteras i forskningspropositionen: hälsa, klimat och digitalisering | Kommissionen för Jämlik Hälsa

Häromdagen presenterade regeringen den forskningspolitiska propositionen (Prop. 2016/17:50). I korthet konstaterar regeringen att forskningspolitiken under lång tid haft en övertro på att politiskt identifiera framstående forskning och snabba resultat vilket man nu tar ett steg bort från. Universitets och högskolors basanslag höjs därför med 1,3 miljarder kronor till 2020. Regeringens syfte med ökningen är inte att öka antalet forskare. Avsikten är att höja kvaliteten och att ge större utrymme för forskning inom anställningarna samt en tydlig karriärstruktur, skriver Helene Hellmark Knutsson, minister för högre utbildning och forskning, på DN-debatt. Hälsa pekas ut som prioriterad samhällsutmaning En utgångspunkt är att värna den fria forskningen samtidigt som forskningspolitiken svarar mot globala och nationella samhällsutmaningar. Prioriterade utmaningar är klimat och miljö, hälsa, ökad digitalisering, ett hållbart samhälle och förbättrade kunskapsresultat i det svenska skol- och utbildningssystemet. Regeringen adresserar hälsoutmaningen som mångfacetterad både nationellt…

Source: Tre utmaningar prioriteras i forskningspropositionen: hälsa, klimat och digitalisering | Kommissionen för Jämlik Hälsa

Tre utmaningar prioriteras i forskningspropositionen: hälsa, klimat och digitalisering | Kommissionen för Jämlik Hälsa

The not-so-innocent LEGO brick

When I think of the Danish company LEGO, the first image that comes to mind is their classical LEGO brick, and I am sure I am not the only one. This simple but advanced toy was designed to spur children’s imagination and creativity by allowing them to build almost anything by putting bricks together, with or without instruction. Today, LEGO is the world’s largest toy maker and their products have come a long way from the original LEGO brick of my childhood to branded toy collections for popular franchises, such as the Star Wars series, taking over toy stores. LEGO’s popularity has even culminated in a 2014 film that anthropomorphize the toy collection. Recently, a PLOS ONE article with a creative research focus received substantial attention from many news outlets, including Foreign Policy, The Guardian, The Atlantic, and even received coverage in Sweden. The researchers investigated if LEGO products have become more violent over time. When I was a child growing up in the 1980s and

Source: The not-so-innocent LEGO brick

The not-so-innocent LEGO brick

To Fight Superbugs, Fight Poverty | Public Health

On May 26, 2016, researchers at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center reported the first case of what they called a “truly pan-drug resistant bacteria.” By now, the story has been well-covered in the media: a month earlier, a 49 year old woman walked into a clinic in Pennsylvania with what seemed to be a urinary tract infection. But tests revealed something far scarier—both for her and public health officials. The strain of E. Coli that infiltrated her body has a gene that makes it bulletproof to colistin, the so-called last resort antibiotic. Most have pinned the blame for the impending doom of a “post-antibiotic world” on the overuse of antibiotics and a lack of new ones in the development pipeline. But there’s another superbug incubator that hasn’t gotten the attention it deserves: poverty. Last month at the IMF meeting in Washington, D.C., UK Chancellor George Osborne warned about the potentially devastating human and economic cost of antimicrobial resistance. He called

Source: To Fight Superbugs, Fight Poverty | Public Health

To Fight Superbugs, Fight Poverty | Public Health

Wikipedia Year of Science: An Open Opportunity for Participation

Publishers of peer-reviewed Open Access journals such as PLOS are driven by the realization that, because taxpayers fund the overwhelming majority of biomedical research, there is a moral imperative for the results of this publicly-funded work to be freely and immediately available to those who fund it. In fact, legislators, policymakers and institutions have reached the same conclusion. But what happens to that Open Access scientific content outside the academic or entrepreneurial domain? In today’s world, there is no reason to limit access to knowledge, and every reason to free it. But the information shared must be reliable, reputable and trusted. This does not mean there is only one perspective or definitive scientific result; research is full of subtleties that inform distinct perspectives and influence final outcomes. What does matter is that science in the public domain, such as content in Wikipedia, is accurate and referenced soundly. Where Wikipedia says “citation required,”

Source: Wikipedia Year of Science: An Open Opportunity for Participation

Wikipedia Year of Science: An Open Opportunity for Participation

Tackling obesity needs all of us, not some of us

One of the most important issues facing public health today is obesity. Worldwide, approximately 30% of adults are obese,  and costs around $2 trillion annually. A health concern with complex determinants and many intertwined causes, there’s no single magic bullet solution to the rising prevalence of obesity. A new report by the McKinsey Global Institute studied 74 interventions to see what was effective. They studied 74 interventions that target obesity, which range from subsidizing school meals, adding calorie and nutrition labels, as well as restrictions on advertising high-calorie food and drinks. The report covers areas one would expect, such as energy balance and changing dietary and physical activity behaviours. While these issues are important and do require study, the authors also looked at the environment and how that impacts obesity. There’s a lot of literature that shows that your environment plays a large role in obesity, and simply telling someone to ‘eat less and move

Source: Tackling obesity needs all of us, not some of us

Tackling obesity needs all of us, not some of us